Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Outcomes of Movement4

What are the likely examples of repressions (since the ideology and means are different than of state) of movements by the state and what are the likely outcomes from this?

39 comments:

Arshia said...

The Telangana movement can be an example of a kind of movement. There is an ideology mismatch as the State is not in favour of smaller states and the means for protest are also non-legitimate to a great extent. The movement was started in early 70s and as still not been put to rest. The outcome is still not clear. Although the State has softened over the years but it still supports a one state stand, while the growing unrest and increased politicisation of the issue may see the Andhra Pradesh dividing into two parts.

Arshia Gupta (32057)

Chocodips said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Chocodips said...

A good example of the repressive movement is the civil disobedience movement or the non-cooperation movement. The likely outcomes however, were that the movement succeeded. The ideology of freedom for India was against the British Raj as was the method of Satyagraha regarded as illegitimate by them, as is seen in the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre.
-Bhavi Patel (32011)

Chocodips said...

Another example I can give of this, is the Boston Tea Party during the American Civil War. The Americans who were supposed to unload the tea from the ship, had thrown all the crates into the sea and set the ship on fire. Here, the ideology of the civil war and the violent method employed were against the State.

Ayan Roy said...

An example of this is the confrontation between the Maoists and the Indian state. The Indian state swears by the Constitution and upholds the rule of law. The Maoists have no faith in the Constitution or parliamentary Democracy. The Maoists believe in violence as a means of overthrowing the state. The Indian state has decided to counter Maoist violence by deploying para-military forces and through some non-violent administrative and social welfare measures in the Maoist affected areas. The state has succeeded in controlling the Maoist threat to some extent although sporadic attacks by the Maoists are still continuing.
Ayan Roy(32061)

Nilesh Sharma said...

Kashmir is the living example of this kind of movements. Separatist wanted an independent Kashmir state while India considered it as its integral part. They used illegitimate means of violence to get independence which led Indian government to use force. Result is Heaven turned into hell, it continued to burn even after 25 years, misery in the life of people with no development at all.

TOMARSHUBH said...

Apartheid is such an example. It was present in the present day's developed states. It led to the subjugation of the blacks in their motherland. Thought they were the residents of the same nation, they were considered to be an aliens because of the genes and lineage which made them 'Blacks'. The people when started the movement wanted rights and representation which the state was not giving. It clearly shows the conflict of ideologies. Likely outcomes of this can be two-Successful repression or the convergence of state and the protesters on a particular set of demands.
Shubham Tomar
32093

Ankit said...

A very recent example is the protest by traders against the increased FDI proposed by the Govt. on one hand where Govt. believes in good returns on other hand traders believe that this would ultimately harm the small farmers and the mandis, thus respresenting a clear conflict of ideology. As a result, traders associated with Akhil Bharatiya Udyog Vyapaar Mandal took out a protest march against the Union government decision to open Indian markets for 51% FDI in retail sector.
Ankit Sharma
32005

Jainee said...

The activities carried out by the U.S. authorities against many New Left Organizations in the late 1960s and early 1970s can be cited as an excellent example of repressive social movement. Many movements and their leaders were spied upon, jailed and even killed as a part of this repressive effort.
Jainee Nathwani
32071

shashank- EXPLORING MYSELF said...

In Jan lokpal movement led by Anna Hazare ,“defamation” as a tactic was used by government. Charges and allegation regarding corruption was pulled on Anna as well as his supporters like Arvind Kejriwal and Kiran Bedi..All this was done in a planned way so that people become suspicious of team Anna and moral as well as other support to the movement could be curtailed.

Shashank Singhania

Avanita said...

Repression occurs when agents acting on behalf of the authorities, use measures to control or destroy a social movement.An example could be the law passed by the state TADA (Terrorism and Disruptive Activities Act), 1987 as a legislative effort to define and counter terrorist activities which was formulated in the back drop of growing terrorist violence in Punjab which had its violent effects in other parts of the country too. Repression makes it exceedingly difficult for social movements to carry out their activities and recruit new members.
Avanita
32058

Ajay vikram singh said...

The agitation by the farmers (under the name Kisan Sangarsh Samiti) over the Yamuna expressway (connecting Agra- Noida) since they were dissatisfied by the compensation allotted for their lands. The state tried to curb it either by arresting their leader (Manveer Singh Tivatia) for unlawful activities or by pacifying the farmers by promising them facilities like hospitals, schools or partially accepting the demands. Since the agitation is organised, justified and on a much wider scale the state did eventually concede to the majority of demands yet the actual implementation and its timeframe is still uncertain.
Ajay (32053)

Rabindra Kumar said...

Ranvir sena movement in Bihar in mid 1990s and movement for democracy in Myanmar (Burma) can be two examples which show us the likely outcome of repressions. From first example it is clear that if movement is not supported by the mass then state can easily repress it but if it has mass support as in later case of democratic movement, it can bring the state on back foot. Basic fact is that if people see any alternative of current problem in movement then probability of its success is big irrespective of state’s response.
Rabindra Kumar (P32085)

Gaurav Singhal said...

Quit India Movement which started in August, 1942 was repressed by British Government. This movement was a result of exploitation of Indians by Britishers during world war-II. It was led by Mahatma Gandhi. Also, Subhash C. Bose organized the Indian National Army and conducted a guerrilla war against the British authorities. The government tried to repress the movement by arresting their main leader Gandhiji and many other congress leaders. But it had to soon release Gandhiji because of his poor health and had anything unfortunate happened to him in jail; it would then have exacerbated the movement.

Gaurav Singhal (32014)

Roba Jabeen said...

There is a plethora of repressions occurring from ages. One such example could be the military attack by the US on Afghanistan in response to the terrorist attacks of September 2001. The spiral of violence was aimed at destroying terrorism, but eventually it didn’t produce much effective result. Instead, it led to destruction and killing of the innocent people. This shows how the intended outcome of the state has not been achieved despite having power and resources.

Roba Jabeen
p32087

Ankithreddy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ankithreddy said...

Adding to Arshia's comments, here the ideology of State isn't clear, I disagree with Arshia's comments that "means for protest are also non-legitimate to a great extent", it's true only in few cases and also because of pressure especially from seemandhra politicians the legitimate demand of people of Telangana is viewed as an illegitimate one by the State. As we see now from past two years state of Andhra Pradesh is in a complete turmoil, where future is uncertain in all means.
- Ankith Reddy(32054)

Arshia said...

To support my statement, I would like to draw your attention to the article in the link: http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news/AP-loses-property-worth-over-Rs-250-cr-over-Telangana-issue/559730/

The article dates back to 2009 and till then property worth Rs. 250 crore was destroyed. The movement has only grown in size over the years.

Abhishek Misra said...

Taking the Kalinganagar example into consideration, it was evident that the local residents were against acquisition of land by Tata Steel. Hence there were a lot of aggression against the steel conglomerate. But this acquisition was in the interest of the Orissa state government. Hence the state tried its level best to curb the "andolan" in the form of arrests of eminent leaders. The state even carried out a lot of meetings with the leaders of the movement with a hope to make certain compromise in their stand.

Abhishek Misra
(32001)

Durga Satapathy said...

The SEZ controversy can be one of such examples, which started when the government of West Bengal decided that the Salim Group of Indonesia would set up a chemical hub under the SEZ policy at Nandigram. The villagers took control of the area and all the roads to the villages were cut off. The administration was directed to break the resistance at Nandigram and a massive operation with at least 3,000 policemen was launched, in which around 14 people were killed. This can be a good example of repressions by the state.

Durga Satapathy
(32065)

Dhruv Mittal said...

Another example can be Khalistan movement started in 1970s to carve out separate Sikh state called Khalistan. During its peak in 80s, many religious leaders led by Jarnail Singh Bhinderwale started using Golden temple compound for their activities. Since the state did not agree either with the ideology or the means which were being followed, it launched operation Blue star in June 1984. More than 500 people were killed. It was followed by assassination of Prime Minister of India and then by anti Sikh riots of 1984, in which more than 5000 Sikhs were killed.
Dhruv Mittal
32064

guesswho_aj said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
guesswho_aj said...

Tiananmen Square incident can be considered as an example, where there is ideology mismatch between the state and the protesters. The movement which strived for freedom of press and economic reforms, was suppressed by the state.

Ajesh-32002

RAJKAMAL RAWAT said...

The "anit mandal movement" is one fine example in which college students of some reputed universities and institute partipated against the proposed 27% mandatory reservation for OBC in the public universities. This affirmative move of central government (Janta dal, 1991) got a wide spread opposition. During agitation few students even immolate themselves, which compel the government to take backseat at that time. Later UPA government implemented it without much resistance.
Rajkamal Rawat
32035

salman haider said...

Khalistan movement and the russian revolution(early 20th century) against Tsar can be taken as examples of this sort of movement. the state tried to crush both these movements but the outcome in both of them were different. khalistan movement was stopped by the state by coming on heavily on it(outcome was minor change in policies by the state to prevent such instances in the future), while the russian revolution succeeded and the outcome was the change of whole system.
32089

p32021 said...

The varying state response to a movement could be analysed by studying the naxalite movement. The Indian state initially reacted to the naxalbari incident by classifying it as a law and order problem. The movement grew as it was deeply rooted in socio- economic causes. The growth of movement challenged the legitimacy of state and it reacted by using state sponsored violence to curb the uprising. Such a response further strengthened the movement.

Mayank Gaur
p32021

lipsa said...

Even if the ideologies and the means adopted in a movement are different from the state, it may not always lead to repression of the movement. One example can be the unusual demands of the senior doctors in the government hospital that are met by the state even if the demands may be unimportant. To achieve the desired goal, the doctors stop attending the patients and go on strike which causes inconvenience to the public and threaten the party in power. Hence the government ultimately yields to their demands even if it turns out to be expensive to the state.
Lipsa Mishra (32078)

JAY SINGH said...

One of the momentous events in the history of Indian struggle for independence was the Dandi Salt March, launched under the unparalleled leadership of M K Gandhi. With this historic event, The Civil Disobedience Movement was formally introduced on a nation-wide basis. Within the context of the Indian freedom struggle, the Dandi Salt March holds a place of paramount importance. The entire nation coalesced under the call of a single man, internalizing the cherished doctrines of ahimsa or non violence, and satyagraha or passive resistance. With an awakened political consciousness, all segments of the Indian community plunged into a battle, which till date is an instance of the indefatigable power of civilian resistance.

JAY SINGH
32072

Ankithreddy said...

Arshia if you check my comments I disagreed on the lines that protests are non-legitimate to a larger extent, if you look at this movement say from year 2009 the number of incidents which took place like what you had mentioned were low. These type of incidents were high when the movement took a new shape in 2009 but with the time movement changed it's shape and went on in an organised manner except in few cases. Only thing I can say is that conclusions can't be drawn for the whole movement from few of these articles, most of the news paper articles which shows both sides of a coin can be observed in Telugu news papers. If you are interested I would like to share them with you.
- Ankith Reddy(32054)

Mahesh(p32019) said...

Recent events of arrest and state high court’s announcement of sentence to life to Dr. Binayak Sen is classical example of situation of oppression by the state where ideologies of movement differ from that’s of state and state considers means to achieve ideological objectives non legitimate. Dr. Binayak sen is vice-president PUCL (People’s Union for Civil Liberties) and is the recipient of the 2008 Jonathan Mann Global Health and Human Rights Award. He was accused of transporting letters for a jailed Maoist leader who was under his medical care.
Mahesh Dharap (P32019)

kajal kumari said...

The response to state oppression may have different outcomes depending on the magnitude and involvement of people in the movement. A movement lead by influential people involving larger stakes for the government may be accepted at the end,eg: Air India pilots strike. But a small group of farmers' voice fails to reach the state but a prolonged oppression may even force them to resort to ways that shake the government.eg:farmers'suicides.

Parminder Singh said...

There can be two possible outcomes when state tries to suppress the movement with force. Either the movement will die and state will succeed, or it may result in sympathy wave for the movement which will give more strength to the movement. I would like to share two examples, one example is of insurgency in the north eastern states of India, where sate was able to control the situation (to large extent if not fully). Now other example where state failed to control the movement can be cited of violent movement against Gaddafi in Libya.
Parminder Singh (32083).

Nitin D Mendhe said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Abhinav Deep Sinha said...

We can consider the Occupation of Tibet to be an example of this. The Tibetan people have formed a Government in Exile and continue to resist Chinese occupation of their homeland.The Tibetan uprising of 2008 shows that the movement is well and truly alive. This is an ongoing movement and it would be difficult to predict its outcome, but usually history has shown that no people can be permanently repressed.

Nitin D Mendhe said...

The state has been resorting to the way of repression over the years to crush the ideology of the the movements which state feel could challenge its power. A living example of this could be the anti-corruption movement initiated by the yoga guru, Baba Ramdev. When state anticipated that the movement against corruption is going to get momentum which in turn will creat mass sentiments against the regime, the congress govt. used its police force on the demonstrators. Latter on the movement got softened despite the severe criticism from every direction right from the media to the Supreme court.
P32081

Antony said...

The Hungarian revolution, can also be considered as an example, where the government and its Soviet-imposed policies were opposed vehemently. But the Soviet-installed new government ended up suppressing all the public opposition. Public discussion about this revolution was suppressed in Hungary for over 30 years. The events in Hungary produced ideological fractures within the Communist parties of Western Europe. These Soviet actions had alienated many Western Marxists.
Antony(32006)

Ankush said...

The repression of Naxalites in several parts of the country is the most relevant example of repression by the State in India. The naxalites use armed rebellion against the state to demand “justice”. The LTTE’s struggle is another good example of a conflicting ideology and means between the government and the leaders of the movement. The likely outcomes are further alienation of the people involved in the movement. While naxalites in India continue to struggle against the government, the LTTE has been crushed by the Sri Lankan Army.
- ankush khanna (32055)

Manas Mittal said...

Another Classic Example will be the Tehri Dam build on Bhagirathi River near Tehri in Uttarakhand.MOre than 100,000 lac people had to relocate to the construction of the dam.Also there has been constant protest by envirnmentalist regarding concerns of fraglige ecosystem and envirnment.BUt the dam was built by using the authority over the local people to generate electricity which could benifit the industries far located and other metro cities.This example shows the use using the resources of some place in order to give benifit to some another place.
Manas Mittal(P32020)

Abhishek Sharma said...

I would compare here two examples
One is the statehood of Uttarakhand and other the Gorkhaland movement. Both-the demands of statehood. Violence has been a feature of both the movements. UK was granted one in 2000 (demand raised in 1979) and Gorkhaland us still struggling since 1907. The difference in these cases in my views has been the readiness of the state. The state will not move forward until it gets a chance to gain political mileage or the pressure on it becomes unbearable that it seems to the ruling party that it is loosing brownie points.
Abhishek Sharma
P32051